Archive for June, 2016

Mandatory Paternity Leave Is An Investment In Career And Family

R & the boys at the local pool

R & 2 of the boys…

This post was first published in The Huffington Post  on June 17th 2016.

Father’s Day is the perfect time to say this: I regret the name of my last book, The MomShift: Women Share Their Stories of Career Success After Kids, because for the past year or so every time I say the title I feel like I am unintentionally further sidelining dads from the conversation and issue of work, parenting and care.

And that’s the exact opposite of what’s needed.

While Canadian dads are more involved with family life than ever before, currently, only one in 10 eligible Canadian fathers claims parental-leave benefits (a number that has held constant since the mid-2000s).

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5 Steps For Turning “Let’s Get A Coffee” Into A Productive Career Move

This piece was first published in Fast Company on June 3, 2016.

I recently had a “coffee meeting” with a global leader in my field. It had been booked almost three months earlier and had me (happily) taking a car, plane, train, and jitney each way to meet her. We hadn’t explicitly set an agenda or defined the purpose of our chat—but all the effort to make it happen was well worth it.

The truth is that these informal meetings can sometimes prove the most consequential of your career. But it’s easy to be deceived by the casualness of an invitation to grab a coffee and imagine these opportunities are less important than they can be. They aren’t actually job interviews or pitch meetings, but they’re more intentional than chance conversations at networking events.
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Doors still hard to pry open for moms re-entering the work force

“Reva Seth, author of The Mom Shift, agreed that battling the stereotype of the uncommitted mother remains a top priority in helping to pave the way for women to return. “Since I published The Mom Shift, the reality is that in the boardrooms and hallways of Canada’s organizations and companies, the progress on women being able to enter the work force easily after an extended break really hasn’t changed much at all,” Ms. Seth acknowledged.

However, she remains optimistic that change will happen once men, specifically senior-level baby boomers, continue to seek better work-life balance. “Ironically, these guys are most likely to be the change agents that will benefit returning working moms,” she said.”

This piece by Leah Eichler was published in The Globe & Mail on June 3, 2016.

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